Tying up

From Multilingual Bookbinding Dictionary
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Intro[edit]

Definition: en:The process by which a covering skin on the spine of a book is held tightly to the bookblock, especially on each side of the raised bands and at the caps, by a length of cord wrapped tightly across the spine. (Note: Tying up, which represented the first effort to mold the leather around the raised bands, was first used in the early 13th century. The technique seems to coincide more or less with the first use of the groove method of attaching boards. Virtually all books sewn on raised cords were "tied up" until early in the 19th century. Although band nippers are now used in lieu of tying up, the practice is still employed in the restoration of pre-19th century rare books, primarily to give the appearance of the binding technique of the times.That tying up declined after the early 19th century was probably due to several factors, including: 1) leather in trade binding was replaced by cloth; 2) sewing on raised cords itself declined; and 3) standards of finishing in fine binding were improving and neater work could be done without the use of cords and, in any event, tying up was unnecessary if the leather was properly prepared and drawn on. Large books were (and still are) tied up, especially when the covering leather is intractable. e.g., pigskin.)

Related terms[edit]

Language code"Language code" is a predefined property that represents a BCP47 formatted language code and is provided by Semantic MediaWiki.Translated termCitation referenceThis property is a special property in this wiki.Citation textThis property is a special property in this wiki.StatusSkos:scopeNote
dedas AbbindenCitation needed!preferred
entying up1 "The Language of Bindings Thesaurus is made available under the [Open Data Commons Attribution License: http://opendatacommons.org/licenses/by/1.0] ."preferredThe process by which a covering skin on the spine of a book is held tightly to the bookblock, especially on each side of the raised bands and at the caps, by a length of cord wrapped tightly across the spine.
frfouettage des nerfsCitation needed!preferred
itstaffilaturaCitation needed!preferred

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