Property:Skos:scopeNote

From Multilingual Bookbinding Dictionary
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Showing 20 pages using this property.
A
en:The name given a leaf of the acanthus plant (Acanthus spinosus) introduced as ornamentation in ancient Greek architecture.  +
The name given a leaf of the acanthus plant (Acanthus spinosus) introduced as ornamentation in ancient Greek architecture.  +
en:A general term for any of several substances capable of bonding materials to each other by chemical or mechanical action, or both, and which may be activated by water, non-aqueous solvents, pressure, heat, cold, or other means.  +, sv:Bindemedel är det ämne som ingår i en produkt för att foga eller binda samman fasta beståndsdelar i partikelform.  +
en:Bindings in which the gatherings are held together by adhesive only, without any form of sewing or stitching. They may, however, be reinforced by glueing strips of material into recesses cut across the spine. The earliest examples of European adhesive bindings recorded on printed books are English, with one example dating from the 1620s and a small group from the period 1670-1690. German examples have been identified from the second half of the eighteenth-century and very occasionally in England at the end of the eighteenth century. The small number of survivals from these early periods is a reflection either of the ephemeral nature of some of the texts bound in this manner, or the inherent instability of such structures before the introduction of flexible adhesives. The so-called 'Perfect binding' patented in 1836 and probably first used in 1839 (Middleton, p.30), in which caoutchouc was used as the adhesive, proved no more durable.  +, en:A method of securing loose leaves into a solid text block by means of an adhesive rather than by means of sewing, stitching, etc.  +
A method of securing loose leaves into a solid text block by means of an adhesive rather than by means of sewing, stitching, etc.  +
Bindings in which the gatherings are held together by adhesive only, without any form of sewing or stitching. They may, however, be reinforced by glueing strips of material into recesses cut across the spine. The earliest examples of European adhesive bindings recorded on printed books are English, with one example dating from the 1620s and a small group from the period 1670-1690. German examples have been identified from the second half of the eighteenth-century and very occasionally in England at the end of the eighteenth century. The small number of survivals from these early periods is a reflection either of the ephemeral nature of some of the texts bound in this manner, or the inherent instability of such structures before the introduction of flexible adhesives. The so-called 'Perfect binding' patented in 1836 and probably first used in 1839 (Middleton, p.30), in which caoutchouc was used as the adhesive, proved no more durable.  +
A general term for any of several substances capable of bonding materials to each other by chemical or mechanical action, or both, and which may be activated by water, non-aqueous solvents, pressure, heat, cold, or other means.  +
Bindemedel är det ämne som ingår i en produkt för att foga eller binda samman fasta beståndsdelar i partikelform.  +
en:A style of bookbinding executed during the last third of the 15th century in Venice. Ajoure bindings were embellished with pierced or translucent patterns, in a manner referred to as "letting in the daylight." They generally featured openwork designs of foliage, angels' heads, satyr-masks, birds, baskets of fruits, etc.  +
A style of bookbinding executed during the last third of the 15th century in Venice. Ajoure bindings were embellished with pierced or translucent patterns, in a manner referred to as "letting in the daylight." They generally featured openwork designs of foliage, angels' heads, satyr-masks, birds, baskets of fruits, etc.  +
en:A book of blank leaves designed to contain written records, clippings, postage stamps, and the like.  +
A book of blank leaves designed to contain written records, clippings, postage stamps, and the like.  +
en:A style of finishing in which the entire cover, as distinct from the corners, center or borders, is decorated by a single motif, multiple motifs, or a decorative roll.  +
A style of finishing in which the entire cover, as distinct from the corners, center or borders, is decorated by a single motif, multiple motifs, or a decorative roll.  +
B
en:The process of shaping a ridge or [[shoulder]] on each side of the spine of a text block prior to the application of the [[spine lining]] material. The backs of the sewn sections or leaves are bent over from the center to the left and right until shoulders are formed against which the boards will fit.  +
The process of shaping a ridge or [[shoulder]] on each side of the spine of a text block prior to the application of the [[spine lining]] material. The backs of the sewn sections or leaves are bent over from the center to the left and right until shoulders are formed against which the boards will fit.  +
en:An additional protective covering provided a book. It is usually made of leather.  +
An additional protective covering provided a book. It is usually made of leather.  +
en:Pincers which have broad, flat jaws, used for straightening the bands of a book sewn on raised cords, and also for nipping up the leather during covering.  +
Pincers which have broad, flat jaws, used for straightening the bands of a book sewn on raised cords, and also for nipping up the leather during covering.  +

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